Sunday, April 15, 2012

#MI6 #NeilHeywood : Bo Xilai Framed For Heywood Murder - ENTER Britain seeking to support the present oligarchical leadership of China as it passes on power and wealth to a new generation who will continue to co-operate with western capitalists.

Bo Xilai affair by the Antiwar.com author Justin Raimondo.
Raimondo is suggesting a British role in the Bo Xilai affair and that Xilai may have been framed over the apparent "murder" of Briton Neil Heywood

Heywood had connections to a British MI6 front company set up by the former commando Fitzroy McLean.

Raimondo is suggesting Britain is seeking to support the present oligarchical leadership of China as it passes on power and wealth to a new generation who will continue to co-operate with western capitalists.

Neil Heywood was an adventurer, or so he liked to think: a British businessman with links to a company founded by "ex"-MI-6 operatives, he was close to the family of Bo Xilai, the ambitious and now disgraced former secretary of the Communist Party in Chongqing.
 
Bo was a rising leader of what has been mistakenly referred to as China’s "new left," a popular leader who rid his city of organized crime, attracted much foreign investment, and was angling for a spot on the Politburo’s all-powerful Standing Committee. He also aroused the ire of China’s supposedly "reformist" leadership, and as such he was in their sights when the current scandal broke – a scandal that provoked rumors of a coup, caused the Chinese authorities to crack down on the internet, and brought the British government into the mix on the current leadership’s
 
What is happening in China today is very similar to what happened in Russia after the Communist implosion: the "reformist" leadership in Beijing is quietly selling off the nation’s "socially owned" resources to the highest bidder, creating a class of ostensibly "Communist" princelings – the sons and daughters of high-ranking leaders from the "revolutionary" era – who are living off the fat of the land.
 
They are making themselves fantastically wealthy by establishing cozy relationships with Western corporate interests, taking bribes, allying with China’s gangster underworld, and handing out favors and concessions to the highest bidder.
 
If and when the full story of China’s "Yeltsin years" is ever told, it will no doubt resemble the large-scale looting of the post-Communist Russian economy, which gave rise to the infamous Russian "oligarchs." With one difference: there is a lot more wealth in China to loot.
 
The Framing of Bo Xilai by Justin Raimondo -- Antiwar.com